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Kingston Penitentiary, Ontario: A Glimpse into Canada's Notorious Historical Prison

Updated: Apr 27

Kingston Penitentiary, often simply referred to as KP, is one of Canada's most famous historical sites. Situated on the picturesque shores of Lake Ontario in Kingston, this former maximum-security prison offers visitors a rare and eye-opening look at the inner workings of one of the oldest prisons in continuous use in the world until it closed in 2013. Today, it stands as a monument to a complex history of correctional evolution, famous inmates, and notable escapes.


Location: 560 King St W, Kingston, ON K7L 4V7, Canada


Kingston Penitentiary in Ontario


Kingston Penitentiary in Ontario
Kingston Penitentiary in Ontario

History and Background


Kingston Penitentiary was opened in 1835 and was operational for nearly 178 years. Throughout its long history, it housed some of Canada's most dangerous and notorious criminals. The penitentiary was renowned for its strict discipline and harsh conditions, which have been softened over time due to reforms in the correctional system.


Touring Kingston Penitentiary


1. Guided Tours: The best way to experience Kingston Penitentiary is through a guided tour. Knowledgeable guides, often former guards or staff of the penitentiary, lead these tours. They provide insightful commentary on the history of the institution, the daily lives of inmates, and the various changes in prison policies over the decades.


2. Architecture and Layout: Visitors on the tour will appreciate the imposing architecture of the penitentiary, designed to instill a sense of order and discipline. The layout includes cell blocks, solitary confinement cells, workshops, and other facilities used by inmates.


3. Notable Inmates and Stories: The tours also highlight stories of notable inmates, including infamous criminals and wrongly convicted individuals. These stories help to humanize the harsh realities of life behind bars and spark discussions on justice and rehabilitation.



4. Exhibits and Displays: Various exhibits throughout the tour display artifacts, photographs, and documents that give a deeper historical context to the visitor experience. These exhibits cover everything from the daily items used by inmates to the tools used for prison labor.


Planning Your Visit


Location: Kingston Penitentiary is located at 560 King Street West, Kingston, Ontario. It's easily accessible by public transportation or car and is close to other tourist attractions in Kingston.


Tickets: It’s advisable to purchase tickets in advance, especially during the peak tourist season, as tours can sell out quickly. Tickets can be booked online through the official website.


Duration and Accessibility: Tours typically last about 1.5 to 2 hours. Given the historical nature of the building, some areas might not be fully accessible, so it's a good idea to check accessibility options ahead of your visit.


What to Wear: Comfortable walking shoes are recommended as there is quite a bit of walking on the tour, including some areas with uneven surfaces.


 

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Why Visit Kingston Penitentiary?


A visit to Kingston Penitentiary is more than just a tour; it's an immersive educational experience that offers a glimpse into the darker side of Canadian history. It challenges visitors to think about the evolution of criminal justice systems, the purpose of punishment versus rehabilitation, and the human stories within the prison walls.


Kingston Penitentiary stands as a stark reminder of Canada's complex criminal justice history. Whether you are a history enthusiast, love exploring unique architectural sites, or simply looking to gain a deeper understanding of societal changes over the centuries, Kingston Penitentiary offers a profound and thought-provoking experience. Don't miss the chance to explore one of Kingston's most intriguing historical landmarks.

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